Maestro Workflows in Tryton

This article is part of a series on the Tryton framework, and complements the Maestro project on GitHub. This article explores a number of Maestro workflows using Tryton.

This article is a work in process.

Background

The Swift Construction Company (SCC) manufactures a radio receiver called an Aircraft Wireless. The SCC buys assembled electronics circuit boards (part number 20000003) in lots of 5 from Trilogy-Net. The circuit boards are used in the assembly of Aircraft Wireless units (part number 10000003). When circuit boards arrive from Trilogy-Net at the SCC, they are inspected, identified with a serial number and stocked in inventory. The SCC has a number of customers for Aircraft Wireless units, including B&E Submarines who purchased an Aircraft Wireless system to evaluate.

Product Structure

10000003 ASSY,MKTG,AIRCRAFT WIRELESS
|--- 90000012 EARPH,MONO,HI-Z,3.5MM
|--- 50000001 DOC,USER,AIRCRAFT WIRELESS
|--- 80000005 BOX,SHIPPING,5X4X2,CARDBOARD,WHITE
\--- 10000001 ASSY,AIRCRAFT WIRELESS
     |--- 10000002 ENCL,AIRCRAFT WIRELESS
     |    \--- 80000001 BOX,IP54,4.74X3.13X2.17",ALUM,BLK,SCREWS
     |--- 20000003 PCA,AIRCRAFT WIRELESS
     |    |--- 20000001 IND,830UH,AIRCRAFT WIRELES
     |    |    |--- 90000001 WIRE,MAGNET,38AWG,POLY
     |    |    |--- 90000002 MAG,FERRITE ROD,1/4IN X 4IN,MATL=61
     |    |    \--- 90000003 TAPE,ELECTRICAL,3/4",BLUE,VINYL
     |    |--- 20000002 PCB,AIRCRAFT WIRELESS
     |    |--- 90000004 CONN,PHONE,F,MONO,PCB,3.5MM
     |    |--- 90000005 CAPV,150-230PF,TOP ADJUST,PCB
     |    |--- 90000006 DIO,SIG,GERM,0A95,AXIAL,D0-7,GLASS
     |    |--- 90000007 CAP,ELEC,10UF,16V,20%,RADIAL,ROHS
     |    |--- 90000008 CAP,CER,33PF,100V,10%,RADIAL,ROHS
     |    |--- 90000009 CAP,CER,3300PF,100V,10%,RADIAL,ROHS
     |    |--- 90000010 RES,AXIAL,2.0M,0.4W,1%,MF,ROHS
     |    \--- 90000011 RES,AXIAL,5.6M,0.4W,1%,MF,ROHS
     |--- 80000003 SCREW,MACHINE,PHIL,4-40X1/4,SS
     |--- 80000004 WASHER,FLAT,4-40
     |--- 80000006 STANDOFF,HEX,4-40,0.5"L,ALUM
     |--- 80000007 WASHER,LOCK,#4,INTERNAL TOOTH
     |--- 90000014 CONN,BINDING POST BANANA,INSUL,GRN
     |--- 90000015 CONN,BINDING POST BANANA,INSUL,YEL
     |--- 90000016 CONN,RING,16-22AWG,#4,RED
     |--- 90000017 WIRE,STRANDED,16AWG,GREEN,POLY
     \--- 90000018 WIRE,STRANDED,16AWG,YELLOW,POLY

60000001 ASSY,FIELD SPARES,AIRCRAFT WIRELESS
|--- 90000012 EARPH,MONO,HI-Z,3.5MM Maplin LB25C
|--- 20000003 PCA,AIRCRAFT WIRELESS Trilogy-Net SCC:20000003
\--- 50000001 DOC,USER,AIRCRAFT WIRELESS

Workflows

Serialized Stock Purchased by a Customer

This workflow explores serialized stock in the context of a customer purchase. B&E Submarines desires to purchase a spare parts kit for the Aircraft Wireless unit they previously purchased. A serialized circuit board is used in the assembly of the spare parts kit (preferably a phantom-type BoM to make the parts in it visible), which is then sold and delivered to B&E.

Sometime later, Ed Bentley calls from B&E. He says he found a circuit board, but he doesn’t know if it is the circuit board from the spares kit. Ed is not sure, but he thinks the original board might have failed and he swapped it with the one from the spare parts kit. Ed wants to know if the serial number on the board is the same as the board shipped in the spare parts kit he bought.

Serialized Stock Consumed by a Project

Explore serial numbers in the context of a project. B&E Submarines plans to upgrade 5 of their submarines with Aircraft Wireless systems. A contract is negotiated between the SCC and B&E, and the SCC initiates a Project to capture all related activity (of which the physical receiver units are only one portion). Complete radio receivers PN 10000003 are manufactured, each with its own serial number, traceable to the serialized electronics circuit board within. The completed radio receivers are sold and delivered to B&E as part of the overall project.

Sometime later, Ed Bentley calls from B&E. He has a circuit board in his hand again, and wants to know where the serial number came from. Ed asks if the circuit board was from one of the 5 receivers delivered as part of the upgrade project.

Create, sell, ship, and return a field spares kit

  • Create manufacturing order
  • Issue material to order (serialized PCA)
  • Deliver order to customer
  • Return order from customer
  • Return material to stock (serialized PCA)

Related Topics

Visual display of model

  • Start Tryton client and connect to tryton database.
  • Access Administration > Models and select a model to view the schema for.
  • Select the report icon on the toolbar followed by the “Graph” action.
  • Select the number of levels to display.

Importing Maestro data into Tryton

This article explores importing basic Maestro data into Tryton.

This article is a work in process. The built-in csv import capability in Tryton can be used to import basic data such as users (see the Maestro project), but more complex importing (e.g. product attributes, Bills-of-Materials) must be done by coding using the Proteus library.

Load Users

To be completed – see Maestro project

Load Units of Measure

To be completed – see Maestro project

Load Suppliers

To be completed – currently loading individual suppliers manually.

Load Customers

To be completed – currently loading individual customers manually.

Load Products

To be completed – see Maestro project

Load Projects

To be completed.

Load Serialized Stock

To be completed.

The Tryton Framework

As I was working on implementing the Maestro project in OpenERP v7, I came across a fundamental problem (for me) with product serialization. The out-of-box experience in OpenERP for managing serialized goods does not provide a consistent flow for receipt of serializing goods from a vendor or internal production, to the issue of serialized goods to a customer, and then the return serialized goods from the customer if necessary. It’s not that OpenERP isn’t technically capable, but the required software development is beyond the scope of the Maestro project.

However, the solution may lie in a close cousin to OpenERP – the Tryton framework. From tryton.org,

(Tryton) Is a three-tiers high-level general purpose application platform under the license GPL-3 written in Python and using PostgreSQL as database engine.

It is the core base of a complete business solution providing modularity, scalability and security.

The Tryton framework was created by forking OpenERP v4.1 (when it was called TinyERP). The fork included both the server daemon and the desktop client. While OpenERP is concerned with being a superior ERP-like application, Tryton strives to be a superior framework for building ERP-like applications. The desktop client can be used by end-users, and is certainly up to the task, but some situations may find a simplified user interface more suitable (possibly web-type), tailored specifically to the end-user’s needs.

The Tryton framework and desktop client are licensed under the GPL v3. Although the GPL may not be considered as business-friendly as the BSD, MIT or Apache-style permissive licenses, it is far friendlier than the AGPL – which is the license used by OpenERP after v4.1.

Adding Up SaaS Applications

Incorporating SaaS applications into an enterprise’s business processes can offer a number of advantages, including:

  • focusing internal resources on core strategic strengths instead of infrastructure services
  • being able to pick the best fit from a variety of mature low-risk best-of-breed applications
  • lowered internal IT hardware and support costs
  • well-defined costs

But as always, nothing comes for free and the cost of individual applications adds up quickly. For example, assuming a sales and development SME on a growth track with 100 employees, including a 10-person sales team, a couple senior admin/HR roles, consolidated project management across the organization and a product engineering team who working with part numbers and bills of materials, and using the following SaaS applications:

  • Taleo Recruit for talent recruiting – $500/month (Taleo Business Edition Recruit module, 5 users)
  • Saba People Cloud for basic talent management – $500/month (based on competitor Kapta pricing of $5/person/month)
  • Salesforce for customer relationship management – $1250/month (Enterprise version, 10 users)
  • KnowledgeTree for document management (engineering, legal, administration, etc.) – $2000/month (100 users)
  • Basecamp for project management – $99/month (100 projects, 40 GB storage)
  • Aligni for engineering to manage parts and bills of materials – $199/month (< 10,000 parts)

The total is $4,548/month, and doesn’t include an ERP system for managing financials – which could add another $3,330/month (for either a basic system with limited extensibilty, or the base price for an extensible system before add-ons and customization).

Now, I’m not saying this isn’t money well spent, and for many organizations it is. But bear in mind it’s cash off the bottom line and attention (a rare and precious commodity) taken away from something else in order to learn something new. Carefully consider the complete value – and the complete cost – before signing up for another monthly payment on a credit card, because that’s the easy part.